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Building Bridges

Summit

10 Experts on Unique Ways to Build Unity

A Daily Interview Series Feb. 10-19

                                                                                   Moderated by Dr. Vanessa J. Avery                                                                                                                                            

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Feb. 19 – Cat Moore

Cat Moore is the Director of Belonging at the University of Southern California's Office of Religious and Spiritual Life. She invented and teaches CLICK and SPARK, classes for students on making meaningful relationships at USC through ORSL’s Campfires program.

 

Cat was granted a special scholarship to study the Human Condition at USC & the University of Edinburgh, graduating summa cum laude with honors in Philosophy for her work on the preconditions for community and the transformation of social life through public spaces. She received fellowships to study the engagement of culture through politics and religion with a political think tank and Yale faculty, respectively. For nearly ten years she apprenticed to Philosopher and Theologian, the late Dallas Willard (USC), participating in the development of work around the ethical basis of the professions in American life. As an applied philosopher, Cat partnered with the Los Angeles Unified School District to analyze the role of relationships and integrity in systemic change. She went on to direct creative and strategic communications for a national non-profit that equips rogue do-gooders to transform their local contexts through building bridges of caring relationships. For more than a decade, Cat has been coaching universities, non-profits, civic bodies, small businesses, and local leaders to prototype models for creating belonging. For example, she has supported the Department of Defense, Microsoft, ABC, Starbucks, Harvard University, Yale Divinity School, Bucknell University, Luther Seminary, and CityYear. Her work has been studied by several researchers and universities and received national and regional grants.